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FSRH CEU Statement: Response to the BMJ paper by Mao et. al. (October 2015)

File size: 44kb | Date: 1 October 2015 | Clinical Statements - PDF

A large observational study from the United States found that the risk of unintended pregnancy after Essure sterilisation was similar to that after surgical sterilisation. However just over 2% of women who had Essure sterilisation required a further operation related to the sterilisation procedure within a year.

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FSRH CEU Statement: Provision of LARC methods to young women in the UK (July 2015)

File size: 219kb | Date: 1 July 2015 | Clinical Statements - PDF

The recent article in the Telegraph newspaper has highlighted the complex issues surrounding sexual activity in young women in the UK. Whilst it is true that the legal age of consent to sexual activity in the UK is 16 years, surveys suggest that almost one in three young people will have had sexual intercourse by this age.

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CEU Statement: Glioma and Hormonal Contraception (February 2015)

File size: 209kb | Date: 1 February 2015 | Clinical Statements - PDF

Gliomas are glial cell tumours which can occur in the spinal cord or the brain and are the most common type of brain tumour. They vary greatly in their likely rate of growth, differentiation and prognosis. Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and most aggressive primary brain tumour.

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FSRH CEU Statement: Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (DMPA, Depo- Provera) and Risk of HIV Acquisition (January 2015)

File size: 297kb | Date: 1 January 2015 | Clinical Statements - PDF

Progestogen-only injectable contraception is widely used across the world and is particularly popular in resource poor countries with a high incidence of HIV infection e.g. in sub-Saharan Africa. It is clearly important therefore to establish whether there is any relationship between the use of injectable contraception and increased risk of HIV acquisition.

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FSRH CEU Statement: Oral Contraceptives and Multiple Sclerosis (March 2014)

File size: 59kb | Date: 1 March 2014 | Clinical Statements - PDF

Various news stories have reported the findings detailed in the AAN press release which stated that compared to women who did not use hormonal contraceptives, women who did, were 35 percent more likely to develop Multiple Sclerosis and that the findings suggested that hormonal contraception may be contributing to the rise in the rate of MS among women.